A Tale Of Two Widget Salesmen

Many people see sales as an exercise in confrontation. If you’ve ever bought a high ticket item like a car, then you know what I’m talking about. You want to get a cheap price, and the seller wants to make as much money as possible. For the most part, the difficulties in buying and selling aren’t centered around the price, they’re centered around the transaction itself.

Consider somebody who is selling widgets at a booth. Say the booth is at a home show. For every widget he sells, he’ll make a profit of a dollar. Naturally, the more widgets he sells, the more money he takes. If he had his druthers, he’d sell a widget to everybody that passed him by. This is precisely what he tries to do.

He comes up with a huge pitch, designed to lure in as many people as possible. He claims this widget can do anything, so more people will want it. Because he is so good a persuasion, or sales, a lot of people are convinced they want this widget. They get it home, still feeling happy that they’ve bought this widget.

But a few days and weeks pass, and they find they really don’t have much use for this widget. After a while, they wonder why they bought the thing. Soon their friends start asking them why they bought it. They don’t know. They say they were conned into buying it. The salesperson was really pushy. They bought it just to be polite.

Pretty soon this widget seller has developed a reputation as a pushy salesperson. He has to travel to a new city every couple months, because he quickly wears out his welcome. Such is the life of a traveling widget salesman.

Now consider another widget salesman. He doesn’t promise the moon. He just says what the widget does. His reputation is more important to him than anything. Instead of trying to sell his widget to every single person that walks by, he qualifies his customers. He asks them questions to make sure they can get a real use out of the widget. Plenty of people like the widget, think it looks cool, but the widget salesman is clear that they really won’t get much use out of it, unless they really do need it.

So a lot fewer people buy his widgets. But the ones that do, really use it. And enjoy it. And tell all their friends. Pretty soon people that really need this widget are beating down this poor widget salesman’s door trying to buy his product.

Before long, he’s got a huge mail order business, and he doesn’t have to do any more traveling to sell his widgets. He can relax at home, while his business runs itself. He out-sources all the people he needs to handle his orders.

The first widget salesman was worried about not selling anything, and thus created a life of hardship. The second widget salesman was convinced of the quality of his product, and in the interest of his reputation, only wanted to put it in the hands of people who really needed it. As a result, he lives and easy life with easy money.

Which one are you?

Android Widgets – How to Get Them Developed

A widget is popular as standalone application; an onscreen device for performing a variety of operations. The feature was first introduced in Android 1.5 and since then it has been encouraging developers to work on exciting Android widget development projects. Google provides numerous tools and tips to Android widget devs who want to work on widgets for apps, games and websites. The best use of a widget is that it provides easy accessibility to users; they need not to launch any application for a task.

Widgets are the first love of smartphone users because they do not only turn the screen very attractive but also make an operation executed on a single tap. Businesses are getting widgets developed and increasing the chances of users to access their application or website.

Android provides the best of the supports for widget development. This feature sets the OS apart from others like iPhone, BlackBerry and Symbian. Though, developers should have a clear idea what the widget is all about so that they can deliver to users what they are looking for.

-The first thing developers should keep in mind is that they need to build a straightforward widget providing quick and easy access to information.

-The theme of the widget should be customized and designed in way that can leave strong impression on users and persuade them to use it again and again.

-A widget with above mentioned features cements its place in the minds of users.

Android widget development may be aimed at particular device such as for HTC smartphone, Samsung Smartphone, Motorola smartphone and so on.

When it comes to widget development for Android, the developers should have hands-on experience with several versions of the OS. A widget should support all Android operating systems including Android 1.5 (Cupcake), 1.6 (Donut), 2.1 (Éclair), 2.2 (Froyo), 2.3 (Gingerbread), 3.0 (Honeycomb) and 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich).

A widget should also be cool to easily capture the imagination of users and to add value to the app as well.

You should hire an Android widget developer who has excellent aesthetic sense coupled with outstanding technical skills.

You can also ask the developer about its previous Android widget development projects and check their popularity among users.

Android OS provides following features for developing widgets:

1. Handset layouts
2. Connectivity
3. Storage
4. Messaging
5. Language support
6. Browser Support
7. Java support
8. Media Support
9. Streaming media support
10. Additional hardware support
11. Multi-touch
12. Bluetooth
13. Video calling
14. Multitasking
15. Voice based features
16. Tethering
17. External storage
18. Screen capture

How to Develop a Public Relations Campaign for A Small Business

A St. Louis Public Relations professional, I am often asked if public relations can work for a small business.

The answer is “yes”.

Even on a lesser scale, the basics of creating a PR campaign for a small business are virtually the same as creating one for a large corporation.

It involves analyzing your business goals and determining what type of objective you would like to achieve.

Is your goal to increase hits on your web site, build greater trust with your customers and prospects, develop community awareness, or to simply let the marketplace know what products and services you are selling?

Once your goal is established then identify which audiences you need to reach. These should be in line with your objective.

Are your trying to reach other small business owners, presidents of larger corporations, a very select business to business audience, selected consumers, or the public at large?

After you identify these target markets the next step is to develop a strategy and the tactics necessary to reach them.

This is accomplished by creating a mini-campaign for each audience within the overall PR plan.

For example, let’s say your overall PR goal is to influence 30 new prospective customers to engage with you and your sales staff with the hope of turning them into clients.

One of your target audiences could be widget makers. Your objective with widget makers is to create 10 of those 30 prospective engagements.

Your tactics would then include developing a myriad of activities to build relationships with 10 widget makers.

Those activities could include hosting seminars for widget makers, manning a booth at widget trade shows, speaking at widget conferences, securing articles about your firm in widget publications, emailing newsletters to widget makers, developing a blog about widgets, connecting with widget makers through LinkedIn, etc.

Once the campaign is launched it needs to be analyzed and adjusted.

Focus on those tactics that work the best and provide the greatest return on investment. This is especially important for small companies who are usually on a limited budget.

Remember to keep it measurable. This is where a number of small business PR campaigns run out of steam.

If you plan to hit the 10 widget maker mark in six months, you will need to create 5 engagements within the first 90 days. Should you hit or exceed the 5 mark after 90 days you will feel confident that your campaign is on track.

Connect only with one or two widget makers in the first three months and you might have to adjust your strategy.

Whether your PR budget is $5,000 or $5 million the basic strategies of a public relations campaign remain the same.

It works for small companies as well as large ones. The first step is to create a goal and get started.